One week, two cars, two different planets.

Discussion in 'General chat' started by Harry, Jul 13, 2021.

  1. Harry
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    Harry WARLORD Site Supporter

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    Time for the big service for the 320d. Major service, oil, filters, air con service, brake fluid and MOT, which it sailed through. £640 stung a bit but the car has needed zero attention for the past two years, although admittedly, it didn’t do many miles over that period for obvious reasons.

    The loan car was a 118d, which I was glad of because I wanted to sample BMW’s second stab at FWD after the rather fantastic MINI. The new One struck me as somewhat anodyne in appearance and looked lardy compared to the original One. It doesn’t take cars long to put on weight. This one was visibly best friends with the man in the pie shop.

    It looked quality though, and the premium feel took a step up when I climbed inside. BMW are doing some nice interiors nowadays. They needed to, but that has long since been addressed and they seem to be on a roll now. Being a manual, I was sceptical of the electronic handbrake because it didn’t have auto hold. This turned out not to be an issue. There are some steep gradients in Bath and the One was easy to hill start with a switch, as opposed to a lever which you can ease off as the clutch bites. I don’t think it had hill hold because it rolled all over my front drive when cars with hill hold will stay stationary for a couple of seconds, but it worked fine.

    Good seat comfort, premium interior feel, easy to get a good driving position using the latest revised lever setup. No diesel noise or vibration, decent performance, good ergonomics, nicely stacked set of gears which were easy to select and a generally user-friendly package. What’s not to like? Well, since you ask, everything else. As a driver’s car, the 118d I was given was awful.

    Turning circle the size of a football pitch. Huh? How did that happen? Both our BMWs are X Drive and the loss of steering lock is obvious compared to a RWD BMW, but the One has less lock still. In a multi story car park where the 750 and X5 could be posted with confidence (and care) down a ramp, I had to back up the One and do it again, because I couldn’t make the turn, no matter how wide I swung in. It was sort of comforting to see a Golf or something like that in front of me on the way out, also having to back up for a ramp and try again. Then again, maybe we were both crap drivers?

    On the road, the chassis is ponderous and tends to be a bit vague on positioning, despite an incisive bite on initial turn it. But the biggest let down was the torque steer and with a vengeance. In a BMW?! Please say it ain’t so. Again, our two X Drive cars, although more limited in lock than a RWD, exhibit not a trace of toque steer, even when between 40 to 100% of 555bhp and 501lbft go through the front shafts on my X6M. One must conclude that the One is engineered down to a price, which when you consider what a new one will cost you, doesn’t seem like particularly good value for money. I would opt for a MINI and save over ten grand to put what in my opinion is a better sorted, more fun to drive car on my drive.

    Fast forward three days and the 320d went back to have its wheels refurbished. They have become very tatty and are going for the full dip and diamond cut restoration. When I get the car back the wheels will be coming off one at a time, for a full wash, close inspection, a couple of applications of Gtechniq C5 and a topcoat of Crystal Serum light. I just hope I don’t manage to chip them when I drive it home. The loan car for this financially symmetrical £640 repair job couldn’t be more different and is such an impressive drive that I was moved to photograph it.


    [​IMG]

    It’s a 216i Coupe and it’s brilliant. An older design which to my eyes looks better for it. Less seat adjustability and so some compromise on the driving position, which I soon got used to, so it’s not uncomfortable, just slightly different than what I’m used to. Inferior visibility and a good interior but not half as slick as the latest One Series.

    But what got me looking at the AUC website for M2s is the driving dynamics. It’s a proper old school BMW with a really well sorted chassis that grips, changes direction telepathically, feeds back all the time through steering, feet and bum, yet doesn’t smash your fillings out. What a joy. And so easy to position, park, manoeuvre and generally live with. It's also a manual and like the 118d, has six well chosen ratios from which any can easily be selected through the slick gate. I wouldn't buy a manual car, but driving one is good for brushing up the skills set. And when a RWD manual is as slick and accurate to balance on the revs as this, it reminds you why stick shifters remain popular for some.

    We’re not going to chop our petrol car or diesel car in for another petrol now, it’s got to be something electric or semi electric, and the 320d will be the trade in when that day comes. But for a couple of hours last Saturday morning I was sorely tempted, until reality returned, and I had to get on with some odd jobs.
     
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  2. The_Master
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    The_Master Site Supporter

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    Disappointed to hear that the drive of the new 1 series is not up to your expectations, these 2 series coupes have flown under the radar for a while , for me they capture the old school BMW feel, a useful size, RWD and not over complicated which is a bonus....viable option as a 2nd car for some.
     
  3. Wynne71
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    Wynne71 WARLORD Site Supporter

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    Interesting write up, thanks for sharing.
    The 128Ti version of the new One gets rave reviews from many motor journalists. Must have some tweaks to the chassis etc, it has been pushed as a Goof GTi beater.
    I’d have loved Mrs W to buy a 2 series coupe, but she wasn’t for swaying from the four rings, a new A1 was bought instead.
     
  4. Harry
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    Harry WARLORD Site Supporter

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    Thank you both. I'm sure the Ti is more than a little breathed on and I'm willing to bet it's a cracker - compared to the competition. It's all relative I suppose.

    Back in the day, when I was moaning about the E60 and E90 for their wooden dynamics, lousy steering feel and twitchy gait, which was likely tyre related and varied a lot depending on suspension, wheel and tyres fitted, the original One Series was an unexpected diamond. It's RWD chassis had a lot to do with it. They've lost the magic but probably attracted lots more buyers - so job done.
     
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  5. slim_boy_fat
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    slim_boy_fat WARLORD Site Supporter

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    Nice write-up, Harry (y)
     
  6. mystic sport
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    mystic sport

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    I want a 2 series for my other half. I have been looking at 218i/220is and it is good to see that you approve. She has had a drive herself and equally liked it and I love the shape of them. Thanks for the review. Always nice to read an unbiased opinion. My man maths is in full flow though and I am trying to see if an M2 can be possible

    As for the new 1, no thanks!!
     
  7. mach one
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    mach one WARLORD Site Supporter

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    good write up on both cars thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts both good and bad

    My only experience of anything like the 2 coupe was back in the day when it was still called a 1 series coupe and was a 120d that l had as a loner for the week and both of us agreed that it would have made a great fun second car for us
     
  8. Highsided
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    Highsided

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    M2 vs 2M.

    M2 = 6 pot petrol, plenty of go, and v. expensive for what it is.

    2M = 4 pot, petrol or diesel, not much go, and yes, relatively expensive for what they are.

    As an aside, originally after getting rid of the Z4, and looking at purchasing a 1 series coupe, we were sat in the showroom, discovering what it would cost to purchase a 1 coupe to a reasonable spec. Next to the salespersons desk was a 3 series coupe. Compared costs and the rest was history. You really do need to look at a 2 series and a 4 series side by side to realise just how wide the gulf is. As the title reads - two different planets.
     
  9. Harry
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    Harry WARLORD Site Supporter

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    Thank you all.

    It's difficult to look at the M2 Competition without noticing what similar money could buy in the 4 Series range. But look what I'm driving at the moment (and for the foreseeable future hopefully). Things like logic and common sense just spoil the fun :)
     
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  10. Mieke
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    Mieke WARLORD Site Supporter

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    Some useful info there, Harry. It definitely sounds as though the 2 series is the way to go for those that want to retain the driving satisfaction of a RWD BMW.

    Any thoughts on which marque you would be considering for an EV - Tesla, or something else? I had a brief chat with the owner of a Tesla Model X a few days ago, which is like a larger Model 3 but with the gull wing rear doors. He said that it had an impressive 300 miles range, depending how you drive. He did say that he was a BMW owner a while ago, but that electric was the way to go now. With that kind of mileage range I think that the vast majority of journeys could be achieved on a home charge, with only the very occasional trip having to use a commercial charge point. Food for thought.
     
  11. mach one
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    mach one WARLORD Site Supporter

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    a car that you can easily get to an eye watering price of £130,000 plus and if you were lucky enough to get the free unlimited supercharging option you would want to spend every charging minute at a supercharger trying to recoup some of the extortionate retail priced

    dont get me started on Tesla they are the Apple equivalent of the car world
     
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  12. a.s.uk
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    a.s.uk WARLORD

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    New 240i..?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. Mieke
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    Mieke WARLORD Site Supporter

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    I had no idea that they are that expensive - starting price shown as £82K. Out of my league and it's way too big (7 seats) for what I would want anyway.

    I think that the Model 3 is a more reasonable £42K starting price, but with a reduced mileage range of around 220 miles.
     
  14. mach one
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    mach one WARLORD Site Supporter

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    A Tri Motor All-Wheel Drive Plaid Model X has a list of £130,030 before savings tick the Six Seat layout for £6,300 add Full Self-Driving Capability for £6,800 or you could spend £117900 on a Porsche taycan turbo. let me think about that one for a minute. l will have the Porsche
     
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  15. a.s.uk
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    a.s.uk WARLORD

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    Don’t bother with the model3
    Chap at work having a mare…
    Build quality shocking. Doors don’t line up.. boot doesn’t line up
    Paint flaking off cills… it’s dire…
    Cheap maybe
    Cr@p definitely…


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  16. mach one
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    mach one WARLORD Site Supporter

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    there is some tesla horror stories going around like the guy that ran over somthing on the road and broke a $4.00 pipe fitting on the battery cooling system something like this

    [​IMG]

    Tesla wanted to charge $16000 to replace the whole battery pack because they said they couldn't change a $4.00 pipe fitting and had to fit an new battery pack

    and this is the new green future of motoring
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2021
  17. Wynne71
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    Wynne71 WARLORD Site Supporter

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    There is a video of James May ranting about his Tesla. He had left it for weeks, went to start but the standard 12v battery that powers the basic systems had gone flat, leaving him unable to “start” the car. The design was shocking, no ease of access to recharge the 12v battery. Seem to remember he had to take parts of the front scuttle out to access the battery.

    Here:

     
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    Last edited: Jul 14, 2021
  18. mystic sport
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    mystic sport

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    It has genuinely been considered but every time I think of changing the M5 there is nothing newer that really gets me but I still want/need that size of car and I have always wanted to try an M2 and I know how my head works.

    If we get a 240i for my wife (to be) I just know I will be grinding my teeth that we never went for the M2. And an M2 with manual box paired with an M5 with DSG seems to me an almost perfect combination. My man maths calculator is almost burned out lol

    As for Teslas, I just couldn't. Damn they are beyond woeful to my eyes to look at :ROFLMAO:
     
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  19. Harry
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    Harry WARLORD Site Supporter

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    The picture is changing so fast at the moment that I'm not confident about jumping in any particular direction. I've heard too many horror stories about Tesla to go near them, and the Model S and Model X cars I have seen in any depth were built like many other American cars - badly.

    It is most likely that we would initially run an EV as a second car for trips within a 50 mile radius or less - which for the past year and a half has been al of them. Business requirements used to dictate a car capable of a high average speed over medium to long distances, although this may never be the same again as people stick with remote working and virtual meetings. It's too soon to say.

    I don't see any EV currently fulfilling that role because even with a 200+ mile range (which will vary wildly according to the conditions) the infrastructure is unreliable and access to it is unpredictable. In situations where I would be able to get on a charger, how long would I need to wait for 200 miles to go on? If it's more than 10 minutes, I've got lumbered with a comparatively slow car which is incapable of maintaining a decent average journey speed. A bit like the V10 M5 - fast, but you need to keep stopping for fuel, so slow on a long journey.

    As a local runabout, the only two cars that have tickled our fancy so far are the MINI e and the Honda E. They both have a pitiful range and would therefore be limited, even for short hauls. But as things stand, this is the direction we are most likely to take this side of 2030. When we get to the point of only needing one car, we can hope that the technology has moved on considerably, as well as access to fast recharging in remote locations. VAG seem to be properly out in front in the choice and desirability stakes at the moment. But even their most tempting offers are going to be obsolete in 5 years.
     
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  20. The_Master
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    EV technology is moving very fast which in itself is a problem as most of yesterdays and todays offerings will not seem very attractive in terms of their limited range and worries about long term maintenance/repairs.

    Hyundai and Kia seem to have made strides forward in the EV area with the Ioniq5 and have the comfort of long warranties and VW seem to be early to the party with the ID range.

    It's a rapidly moving market and one I wouldn't be too keen to buy into right now, maybe EVs are one as a second car on a short lease?
     

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